Google+ Followers

Follow by Email

Friday, July 30, 2010

Gary E. Fraser, M.B., CH.B., PH.D., M.P.H. - LLU Department of Biostatistics

The Association Between Incident Self-reported Fibromyalgia and Nonpsychiatric Factors: 25-years Follow-up of the Adventist Health Study.

Choi CJ, Knutsen R, Oda K, Fraser GE, Knutsen SF.

J Pain. 2010 Apr 16. [Epub ahead of print]PMID: 20400378 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]Related citations

2.

Traumatic experiences, major life stressors, and self-reporting a physician-given fibromyalgia diagnosis.

Haviland MG, Morton KR, Oda K, Fraser GE.

Psychiatry Res. 2010 May 30;177(3):335-41. Epub 2010 Apr 10.PMID: 20382432 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

3.

For the patient. Why do only some Seventh-Day Adventists participate in research studies?

Lampkin A, Yancey A, Wilson C, Fraser GE.

Ethn Dis. 2009 Autumn;19(4):479. No abstract available.PMID: 20073152 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

4.

Regional differences in attitudes that may affect health behavior and willingness to participate in research among Black Seventh-day Adventists.

Lampkin A, Yancey A, Wilson C, Fraser GE.

Ethn Dis. 2009 Autumn;19(4):439-46.PMID: 20073146 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

5.

Determinants of serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D levels in a nationwide cohort of blacks and non-Hispanic whites.

Chan J, Jaceldo-Siegl K, Fraser GE.

Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Apr;21(4):501-11. Epub 2009 Dec 11.PMID: 20012182 [PubMed - in process]Related citations

6.

Validation of nutrient intake using an FFQ and repeated 24 h recalls in black and white subjects of the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2).

Jaceldo-Siegl K, Knutsen SF, Sabat� J, Beeson WL, Chan J, Herring RP, Butler TL, Haddad E, Bennett H, Montgomery S, Sharma SS, Oda K, Fraser GE.

Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6):812-9. Epub 2009 Dec 8.PMID: 19968897 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

7.

Reliability of serum and urinary isoflavone estimates.

Fraser GE, Franke AA, Jaceldo-Siegl K, Bennett H.

Biomarkers. 2010 Mar;15(2):135-9.PMID: 19863459 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

8.

Spontaneous renal artery aneurysm rupture: an unusual cause of abdominal pain and syncope.

Fraser GE, Poncia H.

Emerg Med J. 2009 Aug;26(8):619-20.PMID: 19625571 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

9.

Type of vegetarian diet, body weight, and prevalence of type 2 diabetes.

Tonstad S, Butler T, Yan R, Fraser GE.

Diabetes Care. 2009 May;32(5):791-6. Epub 2009 Apr 7.PMID: 19351712 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

10.

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status of vegetarians, partial vegetarians, and nonvegetarians: the Adventist Health Study-2.

Chan J, Jaceldo-Siegl K, Fraser GE.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1686S-1692S. Epub 2009 Apr 1.PMID: 19339396 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

11.

Vegetarian diets: what do we know of their effects on common chronic diseases?

Fraser GE.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1607S-1612S. Epub 2009 Mar 25. Review. Erratum in: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul;90(1):248.PMID: 19321569 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

12.

Lifestyle decreases risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

Slav�cek J, Kittnar O, Fraser GE, Medov� E, Konecn� J, Zizka R, Dohnalov� A, Nov�k V.

Cent Eur J Public Health. 2008 Dec;16(4):161-4.PMID: 19256282 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

13.

Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies.

Jakobsen MU, O'Reilly EJ, Heitmann BL, Pereira MA, B�lter K, Fraser GE, Goldbourt U, Hallmans G, Knekt P, Liu S, Pietinen P, Spiegelman D, Stevens J, Virtamo J, Willett WC, Ascherio A.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1425-32. Epub 2009 Feb 11.PMID: 19211817 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

14.

Age at menarche, total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke: the Adventist Health Study, 1976-88.

Jacobsen BK, Oda K, Knutsen SF, Fraser GE.

Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):245-52.PMID: 19188208 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

15.

Missing data in a long food frequency questionnaire: are imputed zeroes correct?

Fraser GE, Yan R, Butler TL, Jaceldo-Siegl K, Beeson WL, Chan J.

Epidemiology. 2009 Mar;20(2):289-94. Erratum in: Epidemiology. 2009 Jul;20(4):630.PMID: 19177024 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

16.

Cohort profile: The biopsychosocial religion and health study (BRHS).

Lee JW, Morton KR, Walters J, Bellinger DL, Butler TL, Wilson C, Walsh E, Ellison CG, McKenzie MM, Fraser GE.

Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Dec;38(6):1470-8. Epub 2008 Dec 3. No abstract available.PMID: 19052114 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

17.

Validation of soy protein estimates from a food-frequency questionnaire with repeated 24-h recalls and isoflavonoid excretion in overnight urine in a Western population with a wide range of soy intakes.

Jaceldo-Siegl K, Fraser GE, Chan J, Franke A, Sabat� J.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 May;87(5):1422-7.PMID: 18469267 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free ArticleRelated citations

18.

Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies.

Schouten LJ, Rivera C, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D, Adami HO, Arslan A, Beeson WL, van den Brandt PA, Buring JE, Folsom AR, Fraser GE, Freudenheim JL, Goldbohm RA, Hankinson SE, Lacey JV Jr, Leitzmann M, Lukanova A, Marshall JR, Miller AB, Patel AV, Rodriguez C, Rohan TE, Ross JA, Wolk A, Zhang SM, Smith-Warner SA.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Apr;17(4):902-12. Epub 2008 Apr 1. Review.PMID: 18381473 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

19.

Black art posters, an incentive to increase study enrollment among Blacks in a large cohort study.

Yancey AK, Herring RP, Fraser GE, Yan R, Baker P, Lampkin A, Kyle J.

Prev Med. 2008 Apr;46(4):370-3. Epub 2007 Dec 23.PMID: 18234325 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free PMC ArticleFree textRelated citations

20.

Fruits, vegetables, and colon cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies.

Koushik A, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D, Beeson WL, van den Brandt PA, Buring JE, Calle EE, Cho E, Fraser GE, Freudenheim JL, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci EL, Goldbohm RA, Harnack L, Jacobs DR Jr, Kato I, Krogh V, Larsson SC, Leitzmann MF, Marshall JR, McCullough ML, Miller AB, Pietinen P, Rohan TE, Schatzkin A, Sieri S, Virtanen MJ, Wolk A, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Zhang SM, Smith-Warner SA.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Oct 3;99(19):1471-83. Epub 2007 Sep 25.PMID: 17895473 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Free ArticleRelated citations

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Lecturing at Jain Temple in October - Vegetarian Awareness Month

I was invited a few times to lecture on 'a general vegetarian topic' (which I did only once, on World Vegetarian Day - October 1st - and Gandhi's Birthday - October 2nd).

I think my point was that the local Jain communities around the world would be in an excellent position to take responsibility for these two events annually and to motivate others, particular others related to India, Indian culture, and Jainism and Hinduism - to acknowledge World Vegetarian Day - October 1st - and Gandhi's Birthday - October 2nd - and the values they represent.

After all, World Vegetarian Day - October 1st - is celebrated globally under the international sponsorship of IVU (International Vegetarian Union - www.IVU.org) and Gandhi's Birthday - October 2nd - is celebrated through FARM - Farm Animal Reform Movement (Bethesda, MA).

I urged them to 'leverage' their ethnic and national identity in the service of their deeply held values and in solidarity with others of shared background whose spirituality could benefit by these encouragements.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Soybean Powered Buses

Are Biofuels the Answer?

November 18, 2010

Given the risks and costs of oil production, the environmental impact of greenhouse gases, and the need for energy security, are biofuels the answer?

Join the Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) for a discussion on the impact of biofuels featuring prominent scholars in the field. Read more...

Given the risks and costs of oil production, the environmental impact of greenhouse gases, and the need for energy security, are biofuels the answer? Join the Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) for a discussion on the impact of biofuels featuring prominent scholars in the field.

Panelists include:

Forest Reinhardt John D. Professor of Business Administration and Faculty Chair, European Research Initiative, Harvard Business School.
Recent articles.

Noel Michele Holbrook, Professor of Biology and Charles Bullard Professor of Forestry, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University.
Recent articles

Alumni and friends of the Harvard community: $10
Undergraduate Students: complimentary

Register here

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

SMOs within the vegan advocacy movement

Wikipedia's article on social movements and organizations specifically mentions the vegan movement and PETA. Did you write it? The spelling suggests that it was written with European spelling habits.

Social movements are any broad social alliances of people who are connected through their shared interest in blocking or affecting social change. Social movements do not have to be formally organized. Multiple alliances may work separately for common causes and still be considered a social movement.

A distinction is drawn between social movements and social movement organizations (SMOs). A social movement organization is a formally organized component of a social movement. But an SMO may only make up a part of a particular social movement. For instance, PETA(People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) advocates for vegan lifestyles along with its other aims. But PETA is not the only group to advocate for vegan diets and lifestyles; there are numerous other groups actively engaged toward this end (see vegan).[1] Thus, the social movement may be a push toward veganism (an effort with numerous motivations)[1] and PETA is an SMO working within the broader social movement.

Modern social movements became possible through the wider dissemination of literature and increased mobility of labor due to the industrialization of societies. Organised social structures like modern day armies, political societies, and popular movements required freedom of expression, education and relative economic independence.

Giddens[2] has identified four areas in which social movements operate in modern societies:

  1. democratic movements that work for political rights
  2. labor movements that work for control of the workplace
  3. ecological movements that are concerned with the environment
  4. peace movements that work toward, well, peace

It is also interesting to note that social movements can spawn counter movements. For instance, the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s resulted in a number of counter movements that attempted to block the goals of the women's movement, many of which were reform movements within conservative religions.[3]

However, citing SMOs suggests that SMOs speak FOR vegans, which is something I specifically repudiate. Most vegetarians, as most vegans, are un-organized - not organized into support for SMOs - a statement that I think can be supported by Partridge and Amato's (outdated, to be sure, since it's 1990) preliminary research on vegetarians (and vegans before there WAS an identifiable vegan movement; we then ONLY had the American Vegan Society in Malanga, NJ).
Further, Keith Akers wrote (years ago, I think in the late 1980s in an outreach flyer from the Vegetarian Society of Colorado) that the vegan (even the vegetarian movement, at its best) is unlike all protest movements, including the animal rights movement. All protest movements talk about what others are doing wrong; the vegan movement is about what we can do right, justly, well, decently, ahead of the curve, and better. In my humble opinion (IMHO - a writing style characteristic of the AR online movement, as I've watched it over more than a decade), that distinction ought to be seriously considered in writing as well as in analysis.

A social movement organization (often capitalized in literature as Social Movement Organization or abbreviated as SMO) is a formally organized component of a social movement (SM). A SMO may only make up a part of a particular social movement; in other words, a specific social movement is usually composed of many social movement organizations - formal organizations that share movement's goals and attempt to implement them.[1] Social movement organizations play coordinating roles in social movements, but do not actually employ or direct most of the participants.

For instance, the civil rights movement was a social movement composed of specific social movement organizations (likeSNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) or CORE (Congress of Racial Equality)).[1] PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) advocates for vegan lifestyles along with its other aims. But PETA is not the only group to advocate for vegan diets and lifestyles; there are numerous other groups actively engaged toward this end.[2] Thus, the social movement is the general push toward veganism (an effort with numerous motivations) and PETA is only a single SMO working within the broader social movement.[2] The peace movement is composed of many groups that want peace - groups that classify as SMOs such as Peace Action (SANE/FREEZE), Fellowship of Reconciliation and others.[3] Ku Klux Klan is yet another SMO - part of the white supremacist movement.[4] al-Qaeda, acting as a coordinating body for a large number of loosely-connected anti-American organizations and individuals is another example of a social movement organization.

An organizational equivalent of a particular social movement - a collection of all SMOs focused on a given field - is known as a Social Movement Industry (SMI).[1] Social Movement Industries are similar to social movements in scope but are seen as having more structure.[5] Social movement industries can be combined into one one Social Movement Sector in the society.[6]

The term SMO entered the literature through the work of Zald and Ash (1966).[7]

Compassionate Spirit: vegan movement about what we can do right, justly, well, decently, ahead of the curve, and better

Keith Akers wrote that the vegan (even the vegetarian movement, at its best) is unlike all protest movements, including the animal rights movement. All protest movements talk about what others are doing wrong; the vegan movement is about what we can do right, justly, well, decently, ahead of the curve, and better.

http://www.CompassionateSpirit.com

So I AGREE with the Compassionate Spirit that veganism and the vegan movement are about what we can do right, justly, well, decently, ahead of the curve, and better

Sunday, July 25, 2010

The ants go marching

The ants go marching lyrics

SHARE:




The ants go marching one by one.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching one by one.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching one by one;
The little one stops to suck his thumb,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching two by two.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching two by two.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching two by two;
The little one stops to tie his shoe,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching three by three.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching three by three.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching three by three;
The little one stops to climb a tree,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching four by four.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching four by four.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching four by four;
The little one stops to shut the door,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching five by five.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching five by five.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching five by five;
The little one stops to take a dive,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching six by six.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching six by six.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching six by six;
The little one stops to pick up sticks,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching seven by seven.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching seven by seven.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching seven by seven;
The little one stops to pray to heaven,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching eight by eight.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching eight by eight.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching eight by eight;
The little one stops to rollerskate,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching nine by nine.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching nine by nine.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching nine by nine;
The little one stops to check the time,
And they all go marching down into the ground
To get out of the rain.
Boom, boom, boom, boom!

The ants go marching ten by ten.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching ten by ten.
Hoorah! Hoorah!
The ants go marching ten by ten;
The little one stops to shout
"THE END!!"